Human Health News

Nutritionists from across Lebanon gathered in Beirut to discuss the latest recommendations on what constitutes a healthy breakfast at a scientific event organized by Nestlé Middle East, with whole grains emergingas a key ingredient to help maintain healthier body weight1-3, reduce coronary heart disease risk4,5, and lower risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes5,6. 

 Sliced cantaloupe. Link to photo information.By Dennis O'Brien

September 11, 2015

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania has developed a sanitizing wash that could reduce the number of foodborne illnesses caused each year by E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria from fresh-cut produce.

Dike Ukuku, a food technologist at the ARS Food Safety and Intervention Technologies Research Unit in Wyndmoor, Pa., has developed a solution that works better than water, chlorinated water, or hydrogen peroxide at ridding surface bacteria from produce. The solution rids cantaloupes, honeydew melons, and other produce of bacteria that migrate on to cut pieces.

 Photo: X-rays of a healthy knee and an osteoarthritic knee. Link to photo informationBy Rosalie Marion Bliss

July 14, 2015

As you get older, you may notice your knees are less forgiving when it comes to jaunting up and down the stairs. A study supported in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) suggests that if you're not getting adequate vitamin D in your diet, you may be at increased risk of developing the painful condition known as "osteoarthritis" in your knees.

Photo: African mango kernels. Link to photo information

By Rosalie Marion Bliss

March 20, 2014

While surfing the Web, consumers often see ads promising "one tip to a flat belly." But the real tip is accurate consumer information about the products that are being marketed.

African mango (AM) supplements are among the various products that appear at the end of these "one tip" ads. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have studied African mango supplements and found that none of the labels on the ones they tested provided accurate information for consumers.

Photo: Principal investigator Jin-Ran Chen uses a DNA sequencer. Link to photo information

 By Marcia Wood

February 27, 2014 

Does obesity during pregnancy impact the baby's chances of developing strong, healthy bones? No one knows for certain, but ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded studies at the Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center in Little Rock are helping to provide clues.

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